D.C. WATER SUPPLY DESCENDS TO ‘FALLOUT 3’ PROPORTIONS

Pull a cup from a line in the District of Columbia, and you might have seen what the Department of the Army is now addressing in its most recent bulletin.

 

From a letter with a Department of Defense letterhead received last Friday, January 23 from Thomas P. Jacobus.

 

“An equipment problem caused elevated turbidity on December 22, 2008 in water produced by the McMillian Water Treatment Plant. Continuous monitoring enabled us to detect and resolve the problem within 14 minutes.”

The message from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is bewildering. Immediately contradictory statements are made: “Turbidity has no health effects” – and then immediately following – ” . . . turbidity can interfere with disinfection and provide a medium for microbial growth.” While Mr. Jacobus’s attempt to dispel panic seems legitimate, receiving this letter so far after the fact seems less useful. Indeed, at the bottom of the letter is the note “Date Distributed: December 30, 2008.”

 

Anyone who is drinking the water of Central D.C. at least should not be surprised in the least that the quality straddled the turbidity limits. Examining a glass of water through bright light easily reveals the presence of particles on the sides one would hesitate to describe as “very small bubbles.”

 

The general manager of the Washington Aquaduct may be reached at:

5900 MacArthur Boulevard, NW

Washington, D.C. 20016

202-764-0031

[email protected]


 

THIS DISCUSSION IS OVER.